News4us

The Transnational Crime of Human Trafficking Brought to the Forefront Again with World Vision Panel Discussion

Canberra, Australia (News4us.com) February 21, 2011

The Transnational Crime of Human Trafficking Brought to the Forefront Again with World Vision Panel Discussion

The Transnational Crime of Human Trafficking Brought to the Forefront Again with World Vision Panel Discussion

The Minister for Justice Brendan O’Connor today welcomed a greater public focus on the transnational crime of human trafficking.

Minister O’Connor will tonight join World Vision CEO Reverend Tim Costello, actor and World Vision ambassador Damian Walshe-Howling and former advisor to the UN on people trafficking Dr Anne Gallagher, for a panel discussion entitled ‘Human trafficking: the unfair trade’.

“Fortunately, people trafficking is not common in Australia, but it is a particularly heinous crime with devastating consequences for victims and their families,” Mr O’Connor said.

“One victim of human trafficking is one too many – that’s why we are continuing to dedicate funding, resources and time to working with non-government organisations to address this crime.

“The non-government sector is instrumental in raising awareness of human trafficking, identifying cases and providing support to victims,” Mr O’Connor said.

“I thank World Vision for its ongoing efforts to combat human trafficking, along with the many other hardworking non-government agencies that are making a difference to victims.”

In November, the Gillard Government announced:

  • $1.4 million to support four non-government organisations to deliver important anti-people trafficking activities, including community education and victim support.
  • $200,000 to support projects that target labour exploitation.

This adds to the $50 million provided by the Government since 2003 to support anti-trafficking initiatives, including specialist investigative teams within the Australian Federal Police and support for the Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions.

There have been more than 290 AFP investigations into allegations of trafficking-related offences since 2004. Thirteen people have been convicted.

Minister O’Connor noted that there are still a few days left for people to put forward their thoughts on possible reforms to Australia’s criminal law on slavery and servitude.

“It’s important that we look at the existing criminal sanctions to ensure that law enforcement agencies have the best tools available to investigate and prosecute the perpetrators of labour trafficking,” Mr O’Connor said.

“I encourage interested parties to provide feedback on how we can improve our legal framework to stop trafficking and better meet the needs of victims.”

The Criminal Justice Response to Slavery and People Trafficking, Reparation and Vulnerable Witness Protections discussion paper is at www.ag.gov.au. Submissions close on Friday.


Short URL: http://www.news4us.com/?p=6924

Posted by on Feb 21 2011. Filed under Featured News, World. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

Leave a Reply

Copyright © News4us.com